case report

Introducing a holistic approach to conventional medicine – case studies

By  | 

When you incorporate holistic medicine into a conventional practice, conventional work (spay/neuter, vaccination, specialty referral) is considered “alternative”. Here are a few examples of how holistic medicine can help your clients.

Case study #1 – Roxanne, a 16-year-old SF DSH cat

Roxanne was presented in November of 2014 for a second opinion on treatment for kidney failure. The owner’s conventional veterinarian had recommended urine culture, urine protein, creatinine ratio and blood pressure – all declined due to cost.  Three renal diets were sent home, all of which Roxy refused. The owner gave SQ fluids for a few weeks, but because she’s older, she found it difficult to continue.  She reported that Roxy was lethargic, 70 inappetant, PU/PD and vomiting occasionally.

Roxanne’s labs were:

  • BUN 155 mg/dl
  • Creatinine 8.9 mg/dl
  • Phosphorus 10.7 mg/dl
  • USG 1.010

On exam, Roxy was quiet, 6% dehydrated, had a strong rapid pulse, with kidneys bilaterally small and smooth, and loss of spinal muscling.

As Roxy only agreed to eat higher-protein canned diet, we continued that diet, but I asked the owner to offer the food lukewarm, with water added to a soupy consistency.

I started Roxy on Zhi bai di huang wan tincture at 0.15 ml PO BID, and asked the owner to return for a recheck exam and labs in two weeks. On callback seven days later, the owner reported that Roxy was eating somewhat better (and taking the herbs in food, as the owner could not medicate orally).  After two weeks, the owner reported that Roxy was feeling “much better”, but that she absolutely could not afford a recheck exam and labs. I stressed the importance of doing so, and continued to check in every couple weeks. Ten weeks later, Roxy presented for labs only:

  • BUN 35
  • Creatinine 1.9
  • Phosphorus 2.9

Her owner reported that she was “bossing the other cats around again”, was much more playful, eating well, still PU/PD. She was eating consistently, so we added Standard Process Renafood.

I finally saw Roxy for a recheck exam and labs six months after her initial exam with me (I’d long given up hope that the owner would make another appointment, but was happy with heprogress reports). Roxy was still 5% dehydrated, but she had a stable weight and was perky. A mini-screen was normal.  She continued to eat high protein canned diet, with the owner rotating proteins.

I learned two things from this kitty. I will never limit protein in any standard chronic renal failure cat. My Chinese training taught me that protein increases renal blood flow. So if there is no sign of renal inflammation (infection, ^UPC, etc.), high protein diets are indicated. I know this topic had been discussed to death on both conventional and alternative forums. There are DVMs far more qualified than myself who can speak to the physiology involved, but I continue to have good success in CRF cats with water-added high protein canned diets, and a proper herb Rx (which is the difficult part sometimes, right?). Secondly, I learned that animals can heal, even under less-than-ideal circumstances.

Case study #2 – Copper, an eight-year-old MN Viszla

Copper presented two weeks post-splenectomy for hemangiosarcoma. On exam, he was shy, had several fatty masses, BCS 6/9, mm slightly pale, pulse deeper and thinnish. He had been very sleepy on Tramadol (a yin tonifier). So he appeared to be blood deficient and damp in TCM terms.

I started him on Yunnan bai yao, Dang gui shao yao san, cod liver oil, medicinal mushrooms, IP6. Through the next 15 months of treatment, I tried various additions to the DGSYS, but was never able to quite correct Copper’s thinner pulse. He eventually had an acute bleed and was euthanized. I know there are reports of much longer survival times with HSA patients undergoing herbal care, but with minimal side effects the owner and I were happy to have provided Copper with a period of time well beyond what was expected for splenectomy alone, and even chemo.

Dr. Cathy Lund graduated from Iowa State University in 1988 and has practiced in the Minneapolis area ever since (Altpetvet.com). She lives on an acreage with her husband, kids and pets. Dr. Lund likes to spend her free time hiking, biking and gardening.